Activity | Ojo de Dios | Desert Botanical Garden

OPEN DAILY 8 A.M.|7 A.M. FOR MEMBERS WED. & SUN.

This holiday season create art that is tied to nature and has a fascinating history. God’s Eyes or Ojos de Dios are a popular Southwest holiday tradition that have roots from indigenous practices in Mexico.  Ojos de Dios were first made by Wixárika, who are also known as Huichol, an indigenous group in Mexico, during the 15th century.

They considered them good luck and used them for prayer and protection, much like Christians may use a cross. The Huichol people have strong connections to the land, which is why their spiritual beliefs are also aligned with nature and the earth. The four ends of the Ojos de Dios represent water, fire, air and earth. Today, you will find that the Huichol tradition of making Ojos de Dios reaches far beyond Mexico. Try making your own version of it by following the instructions below. This is also a great art project for kids and families. In fact, weaving is perfect practice for enhancing fine motor skills, especially in young children.

SUPPLIES:

  • 2 sturdy sticks
  • Colorful yarn
  • Scissors

Directions:

  1. Select two straight sturdy sticks that are about 4-6 inches in length.
  2. Cut a piece of yarn that is about 3-5 feet long
  3. Tie one end of your string to the center of your popsicle sticks. (Young children may need help with this so they keep the 90-degree angle.)
  4. Crisscross it several times and knot it so it does not move.

  5. Now you are ready to begin wrapping the rest of your string.
  6. Wrap the yarn around one stick at a time and turn the sticks slowly as you wrap the next stick.
  7. Make sure each wrap around the stick is pushed tightly against the next as you move to the next stick.
  8. Continue to wrap each end of the stick and you should start to see a box/square start to form in the center.

  9. When you get close to the end of the string, stop and leave a little tale so that you can wrap that string around the stick and tie a knot.

  10. Repeat until the knot is secure.
  11. If you have string left you can loop it and tie a knot to hang your Ojo de Dios or, you can tie another small piece of yarn to one of the wraps then loop it and tie a knot.

  12. Hang the loop on any desired location and enjoy.
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ADVANCE TICKET RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED FOR MEMBERS & GENERAL ADMISSION
Dec. 9 – 11, 15 – 18, 20 – 23, 26 – 31 | Garden closes at 4 p.m.  Last entry at 2:30 p.m. Garden reopens at 5:30 p.m. for Luminaria ticket holders. Dec. 25: Garden is closed